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20121027
20121104
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are joined from the weather team with more on the science of all this. what is causing a storm of this magnitude? >> ape ve very rare case that t hurricane made landfall in new jersey. it is hurricane season so we do see a lot of storms this time of the year. usually we do not have a high-pressure system over the atlantic, called the blocking anti-cyclone, pretty self-explanatory from that name. but, you said this high-pressure system acts like a block. it is locked out of this system to move into the northeasterly path which usually -- the storms take place, take paths in that direction. but due to this high pressure sitting over here, for a while, it is very strong. cushions it, toward the eastern seaboards, of the united states. and this time -- it did make a landfall in the eastern coast. hence, the biggest storm in generations. now it has the become a remnant of low-pressure systems, so, it is much weaker than, than it was when it hit a landfall. though the tropical moisture brings all the humidity and turns and makes a lot of downpour as cross ts across the. you can see t
for it. -- to work for it. [applause] we should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
's not a pure science. i have seen remarkable enthusiasm. when you see this kind of enthusiasm, you got people really all pump up. if you think about four years ago, had you the democrats in the same spot. they were so excited about the opportunity. now you see republicans trading places with them. i see republicans a lot more enthusiastic, a lot more excited than i see the democrats right now. the other thing is, i think there is a sense that what has happened in ohio, we balanced our budget. we have cut taxes. we've tamed our regulators, not to the point if they don't see a problem they don't jump on it, they do. we have the toughest regulations on hydraulic fracking in america. it's the regulators and towns and pounds small businesses. they understand we can't keep doing what we've been doing. >> sean: ohio more than any other state has been subjected to president's hope and change and new tone in washington. he was going to part the ways and all this other stuff. they have been subjected to the people in your great state to probably the greatest smear, slander campaign with more money spen
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. are you one of them? drink dream water, the natural, fast acting sleep aid that helps you wake refreshed. visit drinkdreamwater.com. >>> there is no electricity. people are living in shacks. growing up here makes you feel like you don't have control over your life. many children drop out of school, because they don't have school uniforms and textbooks. i realized that the only way that this area could change is through education. i'm tulani montondo. i'm helping children so we can change the community together. we help the children by paying for school books, school uniforms. our main focus is a tutoring program we run four days a week. as young people who were born and raised here, we know the challenges of the community. we come together for fun and come together for academics. >> it gives me a chance to go to the university. they are trying to pay for my fees. i also come back and help out here. a little can go a long way. >> math and science and english. >> exactly. >> i did not
the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, science and research, and, guess what, plenty of folks who were running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy, that it would kill jobs, and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out their math was just as bad back then as it is today. because by the end of bill clinton's second term, america had created 23 million new jobs, and incomes were up and property was down, and our deficit became the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin, we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. in the eight years after bill clinton left office, his policies were reversed. americans got tax cuts they didn't need. companies got tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas. oil companies and wall street were given free license to do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. the result of this top-down economics was falling income, record deficit, the slowest
, science, research. and guess what? plenty of folks running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy. that it would kill jobs. and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out, their math was just as bad back then as it is today because, by the end of bill clin totoclinton's turn am created 23 million jobs. the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. because in the eight years after bill clinton left office his policies were reversed. the wealthiest americans got tax cuts they didn't need, and that we couldn't afford. companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas, insurance companies, oil companies, wall street given free license do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. and result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, smallest job growth in a half century and economic crisis that we've been cleaning up for the last four y
to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child to. -- own a home, not rent. have a decent school to send your child to. helps send them to college. help your parents when they get older. that is why we are creating new manufacturing jobs, ted double exports. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. trained to million people over the next three years at community colleges. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump a
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
systems to integrate social media and data visualization tools with social science, analysis. his writing has appeared in the asian "wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organizations around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here in gaston hall, dr. kim. [applause] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of co
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
. that is why we commit to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child wito. rent. a home, not have a decent school to send your child to. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump and 12 million gallons -- barrels of oil over that time. the will level the playing field for the middle-class. because whenever the middle class is given a chance, they have never ever let their country d
to cut college tuition in half over the next decade. we committed to hire hundreds of science and math teachers over the next years. when we talk about the job, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on, own a home, not rent, have a decent school to send your child to come and be able to help send them to college, take care of your parents when they get older and save enough money that your children will not have to take care of you. that is why we are going to create new manufacturing jobs, change the tax code, reward companies that come home not those that go abroad. two million people, two million americans with the skills they need over the next three years at community colleges, working with businesses to ensure that when people finish school they can go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we're going to produce more american made energy, oil, clean coal, natural gas. alone, those will create 600,000 new jobs in 10 years. wind, solar, biofuel. we have already required automobiles to double their mileage. that alone will save 1.7 trillion dollars at the pump a
with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the d.e.a. to do a really radical thing. that would be to use science in determining what substances will and will not be scheduled. because marijuana is on a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the schedule. [applause] anded same goes for -- and the same goes for hemp, which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. there are no bad health and safety effects. yet there are important health benefits. marijuana should be regulated but not in
of the energy sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was designed to suppress certain votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. the right thing to do is to show photo i
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
. with modern technology and science, you can't find one instance. this is an issue that opponents of life throw out there to make us look unreasonable. >> jennifer: actually, congressman, i think you're doing a pretty good job of looking unreasonable on your own. fortunately, voters in walsh's district agree because the latest polls have him trailing his democratic opponent tammy duckworth 40% to 54% for her! and tonight i'm pleased to be joined by iraq war vet joe walsh opponent and congressional candidate, tammy duckworth coming to us from chicago. tammy, welcome back inside "the war room." >> thank you for having me, again, governor. how are you today? >> jennifer: i'm great and getting better all the time. it sounds like you are too. except that i understand that the tea party super pac freedom works, funded by the koch brothers has announced $1.5 million ad buy supporting congressman walsh to, you know, prevent you from beating him. how are you fighting that? >> you know, it is $1.5 million. as of yesterday a
and i built a solar car that we raced across the united states. this is not rocket science, folks. this industry has been around a long time. it just requires political leadership. political leadership that my opponent is not willing to exercise. >> the political leadership came from the president of the united states. we both agree coal must be part of america's energy future. it is low cost, it is much cleaner than it was 30 years ago, and i am and all the above energy kind of gal. the energy costs about 5 cents a kilowatt hour. currently, solar energy is four or five times that much. if coal is the fuel of the past, reasonably priced electric bills are a thing of the past. i'm going to fight for those jobs and i will fight for low- cost energy. >> ok. that concludes the first half of our debate. we will take a 60-90 second non- commercial break and we'll be right back with you. thank you. [applause] >> we will go ahead and get the second part of the debate started. as i mentioned, the situation will be reversed in terms of the questioning. the first part of the second half of t
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
to pay for my fees. i also come back and help out here. a little can go a long way. >> math and science and english. >> exactly. >> i did not go to university, but i would like to help them. i feel excited. >> i'm going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer.
don't respond to hard-line phone calls. or just the science of polling. >> or the number of times i have refused to pick up my phone when i can see it's research firm. but, nonetheless, i think a nightmare frankly, maybe we can all agree on this, is that there are some electoral college/popular vote difference. >> one scenario is that it just doesn't come down to one state, like ohio, is that you got four, or five, states and each one of those five is in that circumstance and then we're in total confusion. >> we have december 31st coming up. not like all the time in the world to make these decisions. >> you talk about ohio, they don't even count all of the absentee votes in ohio until november 16th. it will take longer than that for the provisional votes. andrew, you talked about polls. last time around, our abc news/washington post had president obama's number dead-on. 53%. now romney at 49%. talk about the possibility that governor romney wins the popular vote and loses the electoral college. >> this is our 57th presidential election. in 52 at least, the popular vote and the elect
sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. host: do you want to respond? guest: they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. and homeland security. the right thing to d
. find a way to continue to serve so that josh ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam, who was hit by the mortar round set up his own nonprofit. julian served with habitat for humanity, sean became a youth hockey coach and football coach. ian smith did a fellowship at the police continues and then did an internship and the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. melissa steinman became a biology teacher, and for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finds a way to continue to serve on the new front line. and what we found at the mission continues, is all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people around the country. and i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. your own life feels filled with possibilities. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your adventure. the road before you is long. it will wind up steep hills and down into low valleys. moments of spectacular beauty
social media and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his write ago peer in the asian "the wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organization around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here dr. kim. [applause] >>> thank you for your kind introduction. the curry economic institute is hon snored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partner than the edmund school of foreign services and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really i do do think that the 21st century will be seen as asia-pacific century. many of the growth will merge from the region and of course many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the perspective of asian integration and the security problems on the korean peninsula to name a few. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in the region will be critical
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
.i.h., the national science foundation, so i would take issue with the fact that, you know, the republic of texas is making it all on their own. they're getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i don't have any problem with that at all. but to benefit from the oil industry in such a profound way is a unique situation. we don't have that situation every y -- everywhere. but texas does benefit from nasa, from the national science foundation and the national institutes of health. that's helped spur their economy as well. >> congressman, gary on twitter wants me to ask you, why didn't obama stick his neck out for the nonunion workers who lost their peppings in the auto bailout. can you talk that out? >> that's an urban legend. we are working, nart brown and i are working very hard to help the seven or eight splinter unions that didn't end up doing as well as the u.a.w., the iue crferings wa which had contracts essential to the development of the new general motors. but this is not a union-nonunion issue. there were seven or eight different unions that
reason. i don't know whether that's because how computer science is conducted in universities or i'm not with larry summers that i think it's all social and not physical. and on the other financial literacy. well, we didn't address that here because we're only looking at earnings and not at income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets, includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts and stocks and bonds all financial assets which is to say that every asset in the economy except homes. that's -- and art and gold or whatever. are held by the top 20% of the country. but financial literacy in the top 20%, i think does have an effect on ultimate in come. would it be a good idea to have greater financial literacy across income distribution? absolutely, and it would be better to figure out a way and there are lots of ways to do it for average people to accumulate assets other than their own homes. >> baby bonds, but that is another subjec
workers better than anybody else in the world. i want to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers because we know that's an area where we can't afford to fall behind. i want to train 2 million workers at our community colleges for the skills that businesses are hiring for right now. and i want to work with colleges and universities to make sure that tuition does not keep on going up because our young people can't afford the debt that they're taking on. and that's something we can do. number four, my plan will reduce the deficit by $4 trillion over the next ten years in a balanced way. we're going to cut out spending we don't need. we have already cut out a trillion worth of spending. we can do more, but i'm also going to ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we can invest in the research and technology and education that will keep new jobs and businesses coming to america. and under the guise of reducing the deficit, i will never turn medicare into a voucher system because no american should have to spend their golden years at the mercy of an insurance company. and
. there was a very controversial position i took at the time. i am going to be driven by the science. i agree with what mr. gregg said. the natural resources defense council ranked two of the beaches among best in the country for two years in a row. >> do have any advice on how to deal with these issues in the state? >> one of the students is my daughter. she is interested in these issues. i think delaware is a tremendous place. we have beautiful places, a beautiful environment and we have to work hard to make sure we're protecting that. i think a great environment is a bonus in terms of economic development. gov. peterson past the coastal zone act. people thought that was an economic -- it was an anti-jobs. it turned out to be the opposite. because we have such a beautiful delaware bay, businesses want to be here. that is why we're fake -- focused on the bayshore initiative. one of the objections i have is the thing of the power plant in the coastal zone. the pollutants are sulfur trade we have done is we have waived the requirement to put that manufacturing facility in the coastal zone. we
it's science, it's math, and it's urgent. thank you. >> moderator: you're welcome. talk about health care. moving on to another question, and starting with you, this time, mr. dalton. affordable care act provides candidates teases to affordable health care to millions of americans. critics say it's expensive, takes money from medicaid, and pushes government on people. what do you like or not like about the affordable care act? dalton: access to affordable care is what i like, and what's wrong with the -- what happened here is that the two parties again, democrats and republicans, who i hope i replace by more independents so they are held accountable to be in the pockets of major lobbyists, they doabts come to reform when it comes to the major issues. to allow major lobby groups like big pharmaceuticals, the u.s. chamber of congress, ama, and even aarp, to get in the room and force them to make requirements that are not for the best interest of the people, the reason we have a mandate was because that was forced down their throat. the reason we have -- we don't have a public option, w
. others say it is pretty unusual. i was wondering what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurrican
that comes from nih -- the national science foundation. i would take issue that the republic of texas is making it on their own. they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development sollars, which is fine. -- development dollars, which is fine. the benefit from the oil industry is a unique situation. we do not have that everywhere. texas' benefit from nasa, the national science foundation investment, and the national institutes of health. >> congressman gary wants me to ask you why obama did not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions in the auto bailout. >> that is an urban legend. we are working to help the unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw and others. but this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as other unions. there are many salaried folks who are saying this was the president picking the unions over the salary people. that is not true. there are other unions that did not make out -- it was a bankruptcy. it was a difficult decision. it is not true.
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